26 / AprWednesday2017
BUY TICKETS!

Leopold and His Fiction & Wild Adriatic

Location
10261 Technology Blvd. E Dallas, TX 75220
Venue
GMBG
Time
7pm
Price
FREE GA-PREMIER PKGS AVAILABLE

GMBG Presents

Leopold and His Fiction & Wild Adriatic

w/ Dead Beat Poetry

FREE GA/ $15 Premier Balcony/ $100 Premier Tables

16+ Show, 7PM Door/ 8PM Show

Leopold and His Fiction Biography:

Naked, stripped down and aching with adrenaline is the rawness of Leopold and his Fiction. Originally formed as an outlet for Daniel James Leopold to exercise his lessons from his formative years in Detroit, the seminal force of Leopold and his Fiction is the catalyst for soul-drenched, bare-bones rock ‘n’ roll that shakes with the power of ’73-era Stooges while seducing with the rhythm and blues of Motown. “The band elicits a power when it’s time to perform that is unable to be harnessed in any other medium short of a fist fight,” says Leopold. “Whether that’s on stage or in a recording studio it’s almost hard to contain it. It’s more life than I’ve ever felt before.”

Leopold and his Fiction have been working with GRAMMY®–nominated producer Chris “Frenchie” Smith (The Datsuns, Slayer, Jet, The Dandy Warhols, etc.) in recording and capturing a captivating musical journey that is as relentless as it is inspiring. “Frenchie saw our show and listened to our records,” says James. “He was very blunt and said, ‘I’m confidant I can make you guys shine!’ He brought a lot out of me and the band. The energy was very positive and the songs are confident, edgy and packed with emotion.” Amidst the band’s hook-filled party rock, Leopold is also able to refine his more melodic Neil Young / Jackson Browne side.

The next Leopold and his Fiction album promises a full pallet of artistry from America’s deep, dark underbelly and rootsy fabric to a revival of an R&B, backwoods charm. It goes back to the days when Motown and Stax loaded singles with a shaking groove on the A-side with B-side ballads clearly as comfortable in the same skin.

Wild Adriatic Biography:
Rooted in the rowdy spirit of rock & roll, Wild Adriatic has built an international audience on a combination of groove, grit, and guitar-heavy swagger.
With the power trio’s newest album, Feel, bandmates Travis Gray, Rich Derbyshire, and Mateo Vosganian update the sound of their influences — from Seventies rock to Motown to soul — for a contemporary audience, taking influence from the past but never losing sight of the present. They aren’t revivalists; they’re modern men, carrying the torch of melodic, riff-ready, high-energy rock into new territory.Whittled into sharp shape by a touring schedule that’s kept them busy for roughly 175 days a year — including two European tours, countless stateside runs, and appearances at festivals like Bonnaroo — Wild Adriatic’s three members recorded Feel in Austin, teaming up with Grammy-nominated producer Frenchie Smith in the process. The goal was to shine a light on the band’s strength as a live act, avoiding click tracks, digital instruments, sampled sounds, and other tricks of the recording studio. Instead, Wild Adriatic focused on the same core ingredients — Gray’s guitar playing and soulful sweep of a voice; Vosganian’s percussive stomp; Derbyshire’s in-the-pocket bass — that helped kickstart the band in 2011, back when Wild Adriatic formed in Upstate New York.From the psychedelic “Chasing a Ghost” to the mellow, horn-filled “Come Baby Baby” — the latter song featuring blasts of brass from the West End Horns — Feel offers up 11 new songs of modern, analog, groove-heavy rock, with Wild Adriatic taking inspiration from breakups, friendships, new relationships, tour stops, and even politics. “Appleton” finds the guys paying tribute to the Wisconsin town that’s hosted some of their most most memorable shows, while songs like “Some Nerve” and “Hurricane Woman” channel the influence of guitar greats like Stevie Ray Vaughan and Joe Walsh. Much of the album came together during five separate writing retreats, including treks to Virginia, Texas and Wisconsin. Throughout it all, the songs were written collaboratively, molded by a band of longtime friends who, more than a half-decade into their career, are still turning over new leaves.

“This feels like our first record all over again,” says Vosganian, a childhood friend of Gray since his elementary-school days. “We’re a rock and roll band at heart, but we have heavy ties to soul and blues music, too, and as the band matures, those roots come out. This is a great way to reintroduce ourselves.”

Gray agrees, saying that the real-life inspiration behind most of the album — a painful breakup — helped Wild Adriatic create a record that ultimately celebrates the electricity and elation of playing in a traveling band.

“These songs align with everything we’ve gone through in the last year,” he adds. “They highlight hard times, but also underlying hope and optimism. We’re people. We’re supported by fans who buy tickets and come out to shows, and we like to hang out with them. We aren’t trying to take ourselves too seriously. We’re trying to connect. We’re trying to feel.”